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Whatever others may feel, we feel at home in our Museum. We feel good here, we like to look around the rooms with painted walls, full of beautiful, surprising or simply familiar objects. We feel closer to our parents and know there are stories here to share with our children. Working together everyday, we sometimes feel like a big family. Do you hesitate to believe us? Come to the Peasant Museum and see for yourself…




Maramureș, 20 years later




Kathleen Laraia McLaughlin, Senior Lecturer at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, Photographer
Monica Cure, Independent Researcher, Author of Picturing the Postcard: A New Media Crisis at the Turn of the Century https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/picturing-the-postcard
the 27th of June, 18: 30, in the old room Irina Nicolau

What do these last twenty years of significant change in Romania look like in one of the most traditional and rural regions of the country? U.S. Photographer Kathleen Laraia McLaughlin spent the years 1999-2000 in the village of Sârbi, Maramureș, living in the community and photographing its people and ways. Beginning with a 2002 Fulbright grant, Kathleen has returned from Los Angeles to Sârbi time and again, most recently on another Fulbright grant this year. Her journey as a photographer has run parallel to the development of the village. In 1999, hardly anyone in the village had a camera, while in 2019 hardly anyone in the village has a phone without a camera. With the gains come the losses. Do the villagers have more power now? What is the role of the photographer, especially one from the U.S., when everyone takes pictures? Kathleen explores these questions and more in her newest works, which she will be presenting.

Afterwards, Dr. Monica Cure will lead the audience in a guided discussion to reflect on the questions and emotions raised by Kathleen’s works in a more personal way. What does changing village life mean for us as residents of or visitors to Bucharest? How do we respond to these changes and why? What are the implications for our identity and our future?







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