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Reestablished on February 5th 1990, the Romanian Peasant Museum is the continuator of a long museological tradition. In 1906 the first autonomous museum for peasant art was established. Lucky circumstances brought the art historian Alexandru Tzigara-Samurcaş as its first director. He renamed the institution the Ethnography and National Art Museum and from 1912 on, the National Art Museum. During the 40 years of Tzigara Samurcaş’ leadership the museum was in the avant-garde of European museology.

The so-called “liberation” of 1944 led to the “liberation” of the museum from its own home and its replacement with the Lenin-Stalin Museum.The National Art Museum moved, as a tenant, in Ştirbei Palace on Calea Victoriei, for 25 years and under a new name: the Popular Art Museum of the Romanian Popular/Socialist Republic. During this period, the museographers were forced to “forget” exhibiting some valuable collection pieces, especially the religious ones. However, they succeeded in increasing the heritage of the museum with three times as much objects of peasant art.

In 1978, the Popular Art Museum and the Village Museum are united in one institution. The unification mainly meant that most of collections of the Popular Art museum remained hidden in a long and unhealthy sleep until 1990 when the museum was reestablished and brought back to its home on Kiseleff no.3.

Call for Papers // MARTOR 26/2021 // VISUAL ETHICS AFTER COMMUNISM




Guest Editors:
Dr James Kapaló (Principal Investigator Hidden Galleries ERC Project, University College Cork)
Dr Gabriela Nicolescu (Curatorial Lead, Hidden Galleries Project, University College Cork)
Dr David Crowley (National College of Art and Design, Dublin)


Deadline for abstract submissions: 4th of May  2020.
Publication date: November 2021.


The Museum of the Romanian Peasant is seeking contributions for its annual journal Martor 26/2021, on the topic of Visual Ethics after Communism. Martor is a peer-reviewed academic journal, established in 1996, indexed by EBSCO, Index Copernicus, CEEOL, AIO, and MLA International Bibliography, with a focus on cultural and visual anthropology, ethnology and museology.
 

This special issue to appear in 2021 will problematize the often-uncritical use of images in publications and displays about communism. This themed issue will pose a number of questions for anthropologists, historians, museologists and others. When does an image or a museum display present itself as problematic and for whom? Under what circumstances is it ethically justifiable to exhibit or publish such images or, conversely, to put images aside, leaving them undisplayed? When do arguments based on “the public good” outweigh the right to personal privacy, individual integrity and cultural patrimony of source communities? Inspired by recent debates on the ethics of the use of Holocaust and atrocity photography and colonial-era images of indigenous ‘others’, the contributions to this issue will address the use of images of unwilling participants taken through a hostile lens. The issue invites researchers and curators to find inspiration in various kinds of archives: both personal and institutional.
 

Requirements


We invite researchers working on Central and East European countries and other post-totalitarian societies to address questions of the contextualization and re-classification of images and displays, of dispossession and repatriation of confiscated community and family photographs, and the role that images and material displays play in the formation of personal, collective and national memory.

The volume will give priority to six individual articles (6 to 10,000 words). These will be supplemented by shorter texts (2.000 – 4.000 words) where more experimental writing, interviews or exhibition reviews are invited for publication. Please follow the guidelines for authors of the Martor journal:
http://martor.muzeultaranuluiroman.ro/for-authors/.
 

Martor is a journal where authors are encouraged to publish experimental ethnographic research and accompany their text with high standard visual material, thus, all contributors are encouraged to use ample images to accompany their texts.

We invite contributors to send an abstract (300 words) by May 4th, 2020.
The selected articles will need to be submitted by Friday 11th of September 2020.
Submissions will be in either English or French.
 

Proposals, manuscripts, and other editorial correspondence should be sent to the following e-mail: revistamartor@gmail.com.

 




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